Pets

How to Tell if Your Cat is in Pain: 9 Signs of Pain in Cats

Published

on

Do you have a feeling that something is wrong with your cat, but you’re not sure what it is? Are you worried that she’s in pain? Cats can be masters at hiding their pain, but there are some signs that you can look for to help determine if your cat is hurting. In this blog post, we’ll discuss nine common signs of pain in cats. If your cat exhibits any of these behaviors, it’s important to take her to the veterinarian for a check-up.

1. Pain when touched or handled roughly

If you notice any of these behaviors in your cat, it’s important to take her to the vet for an examination. Your veterinarian will be able to determine if your cat is in pain and, if so, what is causing the pain. Treatment options will vary depending on the cause of your cat’s pain, but there are many options available to help relieve your cat’s discomfort.

2. Loss of appetite

If your cat stops eating or starts eating less, it’s a sign that something is wrong. Loss of appetite can be caused by many different things, but if you think your cat may be in pain, it’s always best to err on the side of caution and take her to the vet.

3. Hiding

If your cat suddenly starts hiding more than usual, it’s a good idea to take her to the vet. Hiding can be a sign of many different health problems in cats, so it’s important to have her checked out as soon as possible.

4. Loss of interest in toys or play

If your cat suddenly stops playing with her favorite toy or doesn’t seem interested in anything at all, it could be a sign that something is wrong.

5. Changes in vocalization

If your cat is normally quiet and you suddenly start hearing her vocalize more, it could be a sign that something hurts. Changes in the volume or pitch of her meow can also be an indication that she’s in pain. Pay attention to whether she’s crying out, yowling, or making any other unusual sounds.

6. Increased irritability

If she’s normally a laid-back kitty and suddenly becomes aggressive or hisses when you try to pick her up, it’s possible that something hurts when she’s being touched.

7. Difficulty moving or stiffness

If your cat suddenly starts having trouble jumping up onto her favorite perch or climbing into her litter box, it’s worth investigating further. She may also start walking differently, or become hesitant to move around at all. This can be a sign of joint pain, muscle pain, or even pain from an injury.

8. Abnormal posture

If you notice that your cat is hunched over or walking strangely, it could be a sign that something hurts. Another sign of pain is hissing or growling when you touch him in a certain area. If your cat normally enjoys being petted but suddenly starts hissing or growling when you touch him, it’s a sign that he’s in pain and doesn’t want you to touch that area.

9. Stop grooming themselves as much as they normally do.

If your cat suddenly starts looking unkempt, it could be a sign that she doesn’t feel well. Additionally, cats in pain may stop using the litter box. If your cat suddenly starts urinating or defecating outside of her litter box, it’s a sign that something is wrong and she may be in pain.

10. Panting or rapid breathing

Cats don’t pant like dogs do, so if you notice your cat taking quick, shallow breaths, it’s a sign that something is wrong. This can be a sign of pain, but it can also indicate other problems such as respiratory infections or heart disease.

If you notice any of these signs in your cat, it’s important to take her to the veterinarian for a check-up. Your veterinarian will be able to determine if your cat is in pain and, if so, what is causing the pain. They will also be able to provide you with treatment options to help relieve your cat’s pain.