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Everything You Need to Know About Chickenpox and Shingles

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Chickenpox and shingles are both caused by the same virus, but they’re two totally different diseases. In this blog post, we’ll answer all your questions about chickenpox and shingles. We’ll cover everything from their causes to their symptoms to how you can treat them. So if you’ve ever been curious about these two conditions, read on!

Shingles

Usually starts with a pain or tingling sensation in one particular area of the body. A few days later, a rash appears–usually on just one side of the body. The rash starts as small red bumps but quickly turns into blisters. The blisters eventually scab over and heal, but the pain can linger long after the rash has gone away.

Chickenpox

Is much more widespread. The rash usually starts on the face and spreads all over the body. And unlike shingles, chickenpox can affect people of any age–although it’s most common in children under the age of 15.

Not everyone who has chickenpox ends up developing shingles

You can’t get shingles if you didn’t have chickenpox first. That’s because shingles is actually a reactivation of the chickenpox virus. Once you’ve had chickenpox, the virus stays dormant in your body for years. But sometimes, for reasons we don’t fully understand, it can “wake up” and cause shingles.

Few key differences between chickenpox and shingles when it comes to symptoms.

For one, chickenpox usually comes with a fever, while shingles does not. Chickenpox also causes itching–a symptom that’s almost always absent in shingles.

There are treatments for both conditions.

Chickenpox can be treated with antiviral medications, while shingles is typically treated with a combination of antiviral drugs and pain relievers. In both cases, it’s important to see a doctor as soon as possible to get the most effective treatment.

It’s rare to get chickenpox a second time

It is possible. And if you do, it’s usually much milder than the first time around. Shingles, on the other hand, can come back again and again–although each successive outbreak is usually less severe than the last.

You can get chickenpox as an adult

It’s much more common in children. In fact, most adults who get chickenpox have already had the virus–they just don’t realize it because they had a mild case as a child. Shingles, on the other hand, is most common in adults over the age of 50.

Vaccine for chickenpox

Is available and it’s recommended for all children over the age of 12 months. The vaccine is also recommended for adults who have never had chickenpox or who have never been vaccinated. There is no vaccine for shingles, but there are treatments that can help shorten the duration of the disease and lessen its symptoms.

Vaccine for shingles

Is available and it is recommended for all adults over the age of 50. If you have never had chickenpox or been vaccinated, you should speak to your doctor about getting the vaccine.

Chickenpox and shingles vaccines are live.

That means they contain a weakened form of the virus. As a result, there is a small risk of contracting chickenpox or shingles from the vaccine. However, this risk is far outweighed by the benefits of vaccination. Vaccination is the best way to protect yourself and your loved ones from these potentially serious diseases.

You can get shingles multiple times

Although it’s rare, you can get chickenpox more than once. Shingles, on the other hand, can come back again and again–although each successive outbreak is usually less severe than the last. If you’re vaccinated against chickenpox, you’re also less likely to experience a severe case of shingles. So if you’re over the age of 50, be sure to speak to your doctor about getting the shingles vaccine. And if you’re not vaccinated against chickenpox, now is the time to do it. Vaccination is the best way to protect yourself and your loved ones from these potentially serious diseases.

It can take years for shingles pain to quiet down (in rare cases)

Shingles can be a painful and debilitating disease, and it can take years for the pain to quiet down. But with early treatment and vaccination, you can protect yourself from this potentially serious condition. So if you suspect you have shingles, see your doctor as soon as possible. And if you’re over the age of 50, be sure to get the shingles vaccine. It’s the best way to protect yourself from this potentially serious disease.

You’re contagious until you see noticeable improvements

Chickenpox and shingles are both highly contagious diseases. You’re considered contagious from the time you first develop symptoms until all of your blisters have scabbed over.

So there you have it–everything you need to know about chickenpox and shingles! We hope this blog post has cleared up any confusion you may have had about these two conditions. And remember, if you think you may have either chickenpox or shingles, it’s always best to see a doctor right away. They can give you the most accurate diagnosis and the best course of treatment.